tag: Notable Figures

  • Haym Salomon bank note signed by Francis Hopkinson, Treasurer of Loans.

    1780

  • List of goods sold to Haym Salomon.

    Late 18th century

  • Two bills of exchange (in French) that list Haym Salomon as a party.

    Late 18th century

  • Letter to George Washington from Congregation Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim.

    1790

  • Stock certificate from the Pennsylvania Property Company, signed by Robert Morris.

    1797

  • Eulogy of Haym Salomon handwritten in the family bible.

    Turn of the 19th century

  • Sketch of Mordecai Manuel Noah, President of the Hebrew Benevolent Society of New York.

    19th century

  • Portrait of philanthropist Mordecai Manuel Noah.

    19th century

  • Renowned philanthropist Judah Touro’s signature

    19th century

  • Renowned philanthropist Judah Touro’s signature.

    19th century

  • Daguerreotype of philanthropist Judah Touro.

    Mid-19th century

  • Striking for Life: Labor’s Side of the Labor Question with articles specially contributed by Samuel Gompers. Published by the American Manufacturing and Publishing Co.

    1894

  • Samuel Gompers’s signature card, inscribed “faithfully yours for humanity.”

    1904

  • Nathan Straus was co-owner of Macy’s and a prominent Zionist philanthropist who also supported local efforts to build pasteurization labs and prevent illness. In this letter he apologizes for not being able to participate in a cause.

    1914

  • Correspondence from Nathan Straus to the American Jewish Historical Society, which is now one of the partners of the Center for Jewish History.

    1917

  • In 1918, Louis Lipsky was “secretary for organization” of the Zionist Organization of America. In this letter he thanks the wife of a Rabbi for assistance in recruiting members in Birmingham, Alabama.

    1918

  • Letter from Albert Einstein in Berlin with proposed solutions to concerns that money earmarked for a university would be used for other purposes.

    1921

  • Letter from Julius Rosenwald to Philip L. Seman, director of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, in which they discuss the resignation of President Jacob Loeb. The Institute promoted the welfare of Jewish immigrants and residents.

    1922

  • Letter from Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of Labor, regarding the German Trade Union movement.

    1923

  • Bezalel Exhibition Journal. Nathan Straus was a major donor to what would become the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, the national art academy of Israel.

    1926

  • Note from Justice Louis Brandeis expressing concern about his name being used in fundraising efforts.

    1930

  • Tribute to Albert Einstein concert program for a New York Zionist Region event at Carnegie Hall.

    1934

  • Letter thanking Judge Goldstein for increasing his contribution to the Federation at a Lawyers’ Division fundraising event.

    1936

  • Letter to Louis Lipsky after the United Palestine Appeal fundraiser “Night of Stars” stating the highest amount of money that was raised in the series of annual events.

    1937

  • Letter from Chaim Weizmann, first President of the State of Israel, to American Zionists.

    1939

  • Letter from Brandeis to David Ben-Gurion, the first Prime Minister of Israel.

    1940

  • Dust jacket of the book Haym Salomon: Son of Liberty, published in New York.

    1941

  • Letter from Chaim Weizmann, first President of Israel, inviting American Jews to New York to discuss the “present Zionist situation.”

    1942

  • President Dwight D. Eisenhower at a Federation event.

    Mid-20th century

  • Admission ticket to an event honoring Union President David Dubinksy.

    1957

  • Soviet Jewry Solidarity Sunday. Left to right: Morris Abram (Chairman of National Conference on Soviet Jewry), Ed Koch (former Mayor of New York City) and Anatoly Sharansky.

    Late 20th century

  • President Reagan with Ovadia Yosef, Sephardi Chief Rabbi of Israel.

    Early 1980s


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Contributors to the Cause includes only a small portion of the material that is housed at the Center for Jewish History. The five partners’ archival collections span more than 700 years of history. To search the catalog, click here. To plan your visit to the Center’s New York home, click here.